Ten questions for a Romney White House

Ten questions for a Romney White House

Once the White House is Romney’s home, how will official White House procedure mesh with his religious convictions? Besides the obvious – Will the White House include reproductive health coverage in its insurance package? – as an ex-Mormon, I have a few other questions that have popped up in recent months.

1. Would coffee or tea be served to guests and staff? Would the Romneys keep these items in their home? Will there be religious exemptions (PDF^) to common courtesy when he’s in charge? Will they revise the presidential portraits to reflect the time-immemorial No Smoking policy of the White House?

2. Would he appoint czars posthumously? Would they get back pay? If so, will 10% tithing be surrendered to the Church (as they likely have already been posthumously converted).

3. Will we ever watch a televised address without picturing him in his underwear? Also, is the White House cleaners going to be specially outfitted for handling the family’s special undies?

4. In accordance with not only Church doctrine, but also The Ten Commandments, will he take Sundays off? Will the staff? Not that any other politician who waves the Ten Commandments in our faces every election cycle has ever held themselves to the morals they want to enforce upon the rest of us, but it only takes one theocrat to set a precedent!

5. Does he plan to serve breakfast, lunch, and/or dinner on the first Sunday of each month – “Fast Sunday“? This is the day, once a month, where all Mormon children begin to formulate their opposition to their parents’ indoctrination. So I don’t blame the Romneys if this is one of those tenets they overlook when they’re cherry-picking what to wear on their sleeve and what not to.

6. Is Monday going to remain “Family Home Evening?” I actually liked this part, but it was hard even for my single mom to indulge us with once a week. It’s got to be tough for a busy, busy President.

7. To what extent will he live up to his obligations of service to the Church? Will he be given a political exemption by the Church? Maybe he gets work credit as long as he’s doing LDS leadership curriculum-approved work.

8. Will his Bishop have top-secret clearance in order to hear his confessions? To whom will he confess his war crimes?

9. Will the Church allow non-Mormon Secret Service Officers into the Temple, or will they all be required to be members in good standing, with Temple Recommends? Wouldn’t that violate federal hiring guidelines?

10. And finally, having nothing to do with his White House policies, will he be sworn in on a copy of the Book of Mormon? If so, will it be as it was originally revealed by God to the Prophet Joseph Smith? Or will it be the heavily edited and revised version that Mormons currently call the literal Word of God?

I look forward to finding the answers to these questions and more once our crack journalists and Edward R. Murrow (PDF^) inspired media outlets have  a chance to do their jobs. But now that I think of it, I wouldn’t care about the answers to any of these questions if the media were doing its job.

2 thoughts on “Ten questions for a Romney White House

  1. You must have converted away as an ex-Mormon very young to still have most of these questions.

    1) Why would his personal beliefs have any right to affect the actions of the others. The staff and workers that live and reside within the White House would be in no way affected. But just because they drink coffee, doesn’t mean he would need to.

    2) czars??

    3) There is absolutely no special washer required for that clothing. And I would have to question the motives of your thoughts if you always picture Mormons in their underwear.. (your link didn’t work for me, admittedly might be an error of the internet here in Senegal..)

    4)I think the precedent is well set for a President to attend religious services on any Sunday that he pleases. How far he personally feels he must keep the Sabbath-Day holy would remain his personal prerogative.

    5) Again, there wouldn’t be a good reason why the White House couldn’t serve every meal that it’s occupants would desire, that does not mean the Romney family would be required to partake of it if they chose not too.

    6) Family Home Evening is not mandated to occur on Monday night and Monday night only. That is a common suggested time and definitely the trend among Mormon culture, but it can be held any time of the week that the family feels most appropriately fits their schedule. But failing to hold it at all would not affect his standing in the church or ability to enter the temple.

    7) Your article for these obligations of church service leads to something that is not an obligation, so I believe that would answer the question if you read the whole article. I don’t think Kennedy was prohibited from practicing his religion, even though it was different that all other Presidents before him. I could be wrong though.

    8) Mormon’s don’t have confessional time, and I don’t know if you can call him out for committing war crimes even before he is President. But no, as a member of the military, your bishop does not receive any secret clearance, and your admissions to him would remain within the confines of the law. It would make repentance a more difficult and personal process by any account for sure.

    9)That is a good question. touche. It’s possible that he would choose to postpone Temple worship for his years of president, but in the event that he would not, the Washington DC Temple is very large, and I’m sure some type of compromise that doesn’t involve non-member secret service could be arranged. (there are no temples in france due to laws allow the police or government to enter without a warrant or confirmed cause if I remember right.)

    10) Mormon’s believe whole heartily in the Bible. Why couldn’t he use a Bible like everyone else?
    And you can hardly expect a serious argument to ever be backed up by Southpark.
    The wikipedia article you cite is pretty bare, and provides very little evidence of a doctrinal disagreement between those changes. (Although I had been heretofore unaware of those particular ones, that article is missing the majority of the commonplace changes that is common knowledge.

    Great Questions though. I’m sure they will be of national consideration if he is to be elected. I’m not sure though if either candidate is great presidential material.

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